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Experts Archive

  • January 12th, 2012 |

    Public Safety Communications and the U.S. Congress

    The Public Safety community has come together over a most important issue: Obtaining the needed spectrum, funding, and governance structure to build and operate a nationwide, fully interoperable, broadband network to add data and video capabilities to its existing voice and slow-speed data capabilities. Today’s commercial networks offer these services but are not built to be mission-critical, which is a requirement of the Public Safety community. This paper discusses the issues and the differences between the U.S. Senate bi-partisan approach and the U.S. House of Representatives’ majority leadership approach to solving this problem. Click here to download the full document.

  • September 23rd, 2011 |

    Project Cornerstone Network LTE Testing

  • September 6th, 2011 |

    D Block and S. 911 Talking Points

    Sunday, September 11th, marks the 10 Year Remembrance of a day when our country changed forever.

    On 9/11, hundreds of our nation’s firefighters, police officers and paramedics lost their lives, largely because they did not have a reliable network over which they could communicate during the largest terror attack in our country’s history.

    A decade later, our first responders still do not have the tools needed to protect the public.

  • September 2nd, 2011 |

    PSA Information Packet

  • June 3rd, 2011 |

    Rebuttle to CRS Report on Interopreabilty Grants

    Some in Congress and on the House Energy and Commerce Committee are pointing to a March 18, 2011 memo from the Congressional Research Service (CRS)1 to assert that the Public Safety Community has wasted more than $13 billion in federal grants for radio communications systems since 2001. In reality, the grants have totaled less than $4 billion and they have, in fact, provided for a higher level of Public Safety interoperability than ever before. In order to fully understand the impact of these grants, it is important to understand the many and varied issues that must be addressed if the ultimate goal of nationwide interoperability is to be achieved for both voice and data services for Public Safety.

  • May 24th, 2011 |

    Re-Auction of the D Block: A Review of the Arguments

    Our analysis indicated that the 10 MHz D Block provides $3.4 billion more in social benefits if assigned to public safety rather than to commercial use, even accounting for the expected auction revenues from that block. That is, the financial benefits of public safety assignment exceed any lost auction revenue from the D Block.

  • November 29th, 2010 |

    Comments of Andrew Seybold: Enabling flexible use of the 700 MHz Public Safety Narrowband Spectru

    Dated September 28, 2010: Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau Seeks Comment on the Technical and Operational Feasibility of enabling flexible use of the 700 MHz Public Safety Narrowband allocation and guard band for broadband services. The FCC has asked for comments on the above matter and listed 22 questions it would like to have answered by the respondents to the Public Notice.

  • November 8th, 2010 |

    Strategies to Implement Nationwide Roaming and Interoperability

    On November 8, 2010, Alcatel-Lucent met with staff from the FCC's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau and Office of Engineering and Technology. During the meeting, the parties discussed strategies to implement nationwide roaming and interoperability in the 700 MHz Band 14, as described in the attached initial and supplemented ex parte presentation based on our meeting.

  • October 31st, 2010 |

    ERIC TAC Comment Filing

    The Technical Advisory Committee of the Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau’s Emergency Response Interoperability Center (ERIC) is proud to submit the following comments documenting its initial perspective and public safety needs associated with the development of a nationwide public safety interoperable broadband network.

  • October 25th, 2010 |

    FCC Paper Proves Need for D Block Reallocation

    This month the FCC published a white paper to discuss its findings that we need more broadband spectrum in the United States to handle the growing demand for wireless broadband services. The paper, entitled Mobile Broadband: The Benefits of Additional Spectrum, starts out with some interesting statistics for commercial broadband usage and demand.

    The Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau could use the material in this paper to reevaluate its stand on the auction of the D Block. Based on these numbers and realizing that demand for data services within the Public Safety community will grow at least on a par with what is happening in the commercial world, thus the 10 MHz of spectrum currently allocated to Public Safety is not sufficient for the volume of data its agencies will be needing, both for day-to-day use and in emergency situations.

  • July 6th, 2010 |

    House of Cards: FCC’s Capacity White Paper Built on Assumptions and Conjecture

    Public Safety Alliance (PSA) takes serious exception with the findings of the Commission’s white paper and we ask the Commission to take immediate action to develop a more comprehensive, independent study of public safety’s capacity needs for mission-critical voice, high-resolution video, highspeed data applications. The study must include public safety practitioners, technicians, and industry experts; it must be able to project the capacity needs of public safety for the next 10 years; it must take into consideration the types of applications that can be used on the network by public safety; and it must provide a solid foundation upon which public safety can build a nationwide broadband network that will meet the needs of our nation’s first responders who put their lives on the line every day to protect and serve the public. Anything less is unacceptable.

  • July 6th, 2010 |

    House of Cards FCC’s Capacity White Paper Built on Assumptions and Conjecture

    Public Safety Alliance (PSA) takes serious exception with the findings of the Commission’s white paper and we ask the Commission to take immediate action to develop a more comprehensive, independent study of public safety’s capacity needs for mission-critical voice, high-resolution video, highspeed data applications. The study must include public safety practitioners, technicians, and industry experts; it must be able to project the capacity needs of public safety for the next 10 years; it must take into consideration the types of applications that can be used on the network by public safety; and it must provide a solid foundation upon which public safety can build a nationwide broadband network that will meet the needs of our nation’s first responders who put their lives on the line every day to protect and serve the public. Anything less is unacceptable.

  • July 1st, 2010 |

    FCC White paper on Capacity Comments - Andrew M. Seybold

    It is clear that those involved in preparing the FCC white paper on capacity tried to make the results fit the recommendations they already included in their National Broadband Report to Congress. In reality, this capacity study should have been prepared and released prior to their recommendations to Congress. The FCC focused only on major events or incidents and did not run scenarios based on day-today operational requirements. These daily incidents will occur in small geographic areas, sometimes within only a one or two block area of a city or within one-quarter or one-half mile of a jurisdiction. In many cases, these areas will only have broadband coverage from one or two cell sectors. Since this is the norm for public safety responses, this should have been the criterion for evaluation of the amount of spectrum required.

  • July 1st, 2010 |

    Motorola Response to the FCC’s Public Safety Nationwide Broadband Network White Paper

    Motorola respectfully disagrees with the staff’s analysis and conclusions in this white paper.

  • June 21st, 2010 | National Association of Police Organizations, Inc.

    National Association of Police Organizations recommends on 700 MHz D Block

    Dear Chairman Genachowski:

    On behalf of the National Association of Police Organizations (NAPO), representing 241,000 rank-and-file law enforcement officers from across the United States, I am writing to request that the Federal Communications Commission’s recommendation in the National Broadband Plan (NBP) be amended so that the 700 MHz D Block is reallocated to public safety. This is necessary to ensure that our local, state and federal first responders have unrestricted access to a nationwide broadband network that will allow them to effectively respond to critical events.

  • June 18th, 2010 | New York City Police Department

    Statement of Deputy Chief Charles F. Dowd

    Commanding Officer, Communications Division New York City Police Department

    Good morning Chairman Boucher, Ranking Member Stearns, and members of the Subcommittee. I am Deputy Chief Charles Dowd, Commanding Officer of the New York City Police Department’s Communications Division. On behalf of Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, I want to thank you for the opportunity to discuss with you today the critical need for Congress to act to ensure that public safety agencies will be able to communicate effectively, now and in the future.

  • June 1st, 2010 |

    NYC 700 MHz Broadband Public Safety Applications And Spectrum Requirements

    Today we are at a crossroads. We can either advance public safety communications by consolidating our efforts and resources to create a nationwide public safety broadband interoperable network that supports both data and voice or we can continue to support separate networks on disparate frequency bands using incompatible technologies. We are under no illusion and fully understand that this is a formidable challenge. The vision of a converged public safety data and voice network will not be realized for several years, and then only when public safety is satisfied that broadband mission critical voice is as reliable as existing land mobile mission critical voice networks. Nevertheless, we also understand that if we do not have sufficient spectrum resources, we will never achieve our goal.

  • May 28th, 2010 | International Association of Fire Chiefs

    Interoperability in Public Safety Communications Equipment

    Testimony of: John Muench, Director of Business Development, Motorola, Inc., Schaumburg, IL

    Chairman Wu, Ranking Member Smith, and members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to discuss interoperable public safety voice communication, and specifically the Project 25 Standard. It seems only appropriate that the Technology and Innovation Subcommittee hold this hearing, given the significant innovation and technological advancements that have occurred in public safety communications, in part, driven by the Project 25, or P25, standard...

  • May 28th, 2010 | International Association of Fire Chiefs

    Interoperability in Public Safety Communications Equipment

    Statement of Chief Jeffrey D. Johnson, E F O, C F O, MIFireE President and Chief Executive Officer

    Good morning, Chairman Wu, Ranking Member Smith, and distinguished members of this subcommittee. I am Jeff Johnson, president and chairman of the board of the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) and chief of the Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue Department located in Beaverton, Oregon.

    I would like to begin my testimony with a working definition of interoperability: the ability of public safety service and support providers — law enforcement, firefighters, EMS, emergency management, public utilities, transportation, and others — to communicate with staff from other responding agencies, and to exchange voice and/or data communications on demand, when authorized and in real time. And while interoperability is very important, mission-critical operability is of greater importance. Without operability, there is no interoperability...

  • April 26th, 2010 |

    FCC White paper on a Broadband Network Cost Model Comments – Andrew M. Seybold

    In its latest effort to convince others that its vision for a nationwide public safety broadband network is correct, the FCC has published a white paper5 that recaps and further explains its rationale for its funding estimates.

    Our response takes issue with many of the FCC’s assumptions, calculations, and recommendations. For clarity, we have chosen to model this rebuttal on the white paper that was released by the FCC on April 23, 2010, and to discuss these points so they may be easily compared to statements included in the FCC document.

    We believe that the FCC white paper is based on flawed network assumptions and design and, therefore, the financial calculations are also flawed. In the body of this paper, we will prove that the entire FCC white paper is based on faulty and unsupported logic.

  • April 14th, 2010 | The International Association of Chiefs of Police

    Public Safety Needs the 700 MHz D Block for an Effective Nationwide Wireless Broadband Network

    Our police, fire, medical and other emergency professionals must have access to modern and reliable communications capabilities, including high speed data and video, to communicate with each other and with federal officials across agencies and jurisdictions during emergencies. A hardened broadband network designed to meet public safety operational requirements and provide seamless nationwide roaming capability is essential for public safety to meet its ever increasing responsibilities.

  • April 14th, 2010 | PoliceForum.org

    FCC Officials Spar with Public Safety Leaders On Future Wireless Communications Needs

    Police, fire, and EMS agencies’ ability to fulfill their most important missions over the coming decades is being threatened by a proposal by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regarding the future use of radio spectrum, according to a wide range of public safety officials who gathered in Washington on March 19 for a conference convened by PERF.

  • March 29th, 2010 | Andrew M. Seybold

    The FCC to Public Safety…

    On Tuesday, March 9, 2010, the FCC met with a number of public safety executives and members of the vendor community in Las Vegas. Not an open meeting, this was by invitation only and the group was kept small. Since all of these types of meetings must be on the record, the FCC published the slide presentation it gave as well as an Ex Parte that discusses the meeting in some detail. While I was not invited to the session, I have talked with a number of people who were there, read a number of reports, and reviewed the FCC’s slides.

  • January 1st, 2010 |

    PTI White Paper

    When and how the 700 MHz D Block is ultimately allocated is critical to the deployment of a new and dynamic plethora of advanced high-tech public-safety applications. The 700 MHz band is exceptionally well suited for the new and demanding requirements of a new generation of video/data/voice devices.

  • September 4th, 2009 |

    700 MHz Broadband Task Force (BBTF) Final Report

    BBTF was given the mission to develop the minimum recommendations necessary to ensure roaming and interoperability among localities and regions that have submitted waivers to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to build out 700 MHz broadband networks ahead of a nationwide network. The instructions to the BBTF were to assume the use of LTE technology and to make recommendations only on the minimum requirements for roaming and interoperability, leaving the regional systems free to design and specify the technical parameters of their systems to meet local needs and giving the freedom to the regional systems to employ any additional requirements and applications needed locally beyond those recommendations in this report.

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